Monthly Archives: September 2012

13 Ways to Create a Cringeworthy Social Media Presence by Corey Eridon

In May 2012, a new free social media tool called Klouchebag hit the web. If you haven’t played around with it already, it’s a tool that tells you how … uh … annoying you are on Twitter. Yeah, we’ll just go with “annoying” for the sake of this blog post. But it got me thinking: social media can be chock full of valuable content, but it’s often buried among the mundane and useless social media updates, or hidden behind poorly constructed social media profiles. And this makes a marketer’s job mighty hard.

So this post is going to outline all of the worst offenders we’ve seen in social media. If none of these apply to you, congratulations! Use these as entertainment over your lunch break. Otherwise, consider these cautionary tales to help protect your own social media strategy.

13 Ways to Make People Hate Your Social Media Presence

  • Launching a Private Social Media Account

Social media is about talking with and meeting new people. It’s right there in the name — social media. So why on earth would you set up a social media account and then set it to, gulp, private? That’s exactly what CVS did when they launched its CVS_Cares Twitter account. If you had tried to follow them around launch time, this is what you would have seen:

Seriously? Well, luckily they learned their lesson and now have a fantastic, active, public account! Remember, the benefits of using social media for your business are virtually wiped out when your social media accounts aren’t public — it prevents you from growing your reach, getting visibility for the content you publish, and growing referral traffic and leads back to your website.

  • 2) Having a Disproportionate Follower:Following Ratio

Have you ever seen an interesting tweet or gotten an alert that someone new is following you on Twitter, open up their profile to learn more about them and see if they’re someone you’re interested in following, and see one of the following screens?

Let’s break down each scenario, starting with that first set of data. This particular tweeter is following 825 people, but only 21 people have decided to follow him/her back. Why might that be? Well, the account only has 8 tweets. That’s not enough content to convince people you’re a worthy account to follow. Instead of maniacally following hundreds of people with the hope that one follows you back, spend time writing interesting tweets, linking to great content that you and others have created, and retweeting others’ tweets to build relationships and earn your followers.

Now let’s take a look at the second set of data. 4,044 people are following this person, and he/she has only returned the favor for 5 people. What gives? We just got done talking about how social media is a social platform … and that doesn’t sound like a two-way conversation to me. In this particular scenario, there are enough tweets to back up the large followership, but a lack of reciprocation such as this can rub many people the wrong way and prevent you from growing your social media reach at the highest rate possible.

  • 3) Writing Updates That Are Too Long

Did you know that Facebook lets you post an update that is 63,206 characters long? Nokia did. In fact, when Facebook expanded the character limit this past February, they took it as an opportunity to test the limits with this expansive status update on their Facebook page. If you’re counting, I cut it off a little less than halfway through.

Obviously, this was a joke (and a great marketing move!) by Nokia, but it certainly proves a point. Is anyone going to read so much text? If your updates are even approaching the length of the update in the screenshot above, get yourself an editor stat. In fact, data from Buddy Media shows that the ideal length for a Facebook update is less than 4 or 5 lines — posts under 80 characters receive 27% more engagement.

  • 4) The Airing of Grievances

You know what no one cares about? This.

Late last year, a Boloco employee tweeted about disliking her job at Boloco. Bad move, but pretty common. What ensued was a dramatic Twitter firestorm from the Boloco CEO, a truncated version of which is pictured above. It all started when he took to firing the employee over Twitter, and then tweets shot back and forth about the situation, attracting horrified onlookers.

The lesson? Keep your personal business to yourself and off of social media — whether you’re an employee, or an employer. If your brand, or employees representing your brand, go on a rant like this, you look petty, unprofessional, and offer nothing of value to your audience. There’s not much else to say on this one except if you’re thinking about using your social media presence as a soapbox to rant and rave, step away from the keyboard and walk away. Your PR team will thank you for it!

  • 5) Talking Smack About Competitors

It’s not just public rants that make you look petty. Attacking your competitors on social media makes you look just as unprofessional, and gives your more sensitive customers another place to send their business. Does anyone remember the Whole Foods case from the early to mid 2000s? For 7 years, Whole Foods CEO assumed an online identity completely unaffiliated with Whole Foods, visited forums and blogs, and posted complimentary comments about Whole Foods while smack talking a smaller direct competitor — who they then ventured to purchase. Aside from an SEC investigation when this was all uncovered, this type of behavior makes your organization look extremely unprofessional. Even if you’re tempted to draft a snarky Facebook update or pointed tweet, hold your tongue and rise above!

  • 6) Making Off-Color Comments

Finally, the last in the series of reputation management disasters. You’d think it would go without saying that joking about or commenting and capitalizing on sensitive news is the wrong way to go about newsjacking. You’d think. But for some reason, every few months we hear about some brand or spokesperson making off-color comments to propel their Twitter following or make a few extra bucks. Remember this tweet from Kenneth Cole?

When considering popular topics in the news to discuss in your social media updates, remember that everyone has a different sensitivity level. Sure, pushing the boundaries is alright, but defer to your common sense; if you’re on the fence about whether you should post something, you probably shouldn’t.

  • 7) Publicly Solving Customer Service Issues

Whether you like it or not, people will take to social media for customer support. Which is why more and more brands are being proactive by maintaining a social media presence (some have set up accounts dedicated solely to customer service, in fact) so they can handle questions and complaints expeditiously. Where some brands fall short, however, is failing to direct customers to an offline or private channel to actually solve their problems. Take a look at how KLM handles a customer service issue correctly on its Facebook page.

See how they sent Ali a private message to handle the details? That’s the right method — nobody wants to see how Ali is going to get a replacement card through a series of back-and-forth comments. The value is in seeing that KLM can handle all manner of customer service issues on its Facebook page, not how they solve them. Don’t clog up your fans’ and followers’ feeds with customer support, and show them that you’ll handle their problems quickly and professionally over email, the phone, direct message, Facebook message, etc.

  • 8) Hijacking Hashtags

What’s hashtag hijacking, you ask? Here’s an example from HabitatUK, courtesy of Social Media Today.

Notice all those hashtags called out in red? At the time, they were very popular hashtags (some still are) that indicate lots of people on Twitter are talking about that particular subject. So if your tweet includes the hashtag, it will appear in that popular conversation. Great! More visibility for your content, right? Well, yes, but it’s not good visibility, because those hashtags have absolutely nothing to do with what

HabitatUK does — sell home furnishings. When you hashtag hijack, you’re putting irrelevant content out to the masses and frankly, spamming. That’s not the reputation you want to have in the social sphere.

  • 9) Piling Your Tweets With Too Many Hashtags

Speaking of hashtags … Twitter has forced a certain kind of social media shorthand on us all. People r used 2 writing n reading updates in a dif way to fit everything into 140 characters. We’ve also all gotten used to reading through tweets interrupted by a hashtag — an annoyance, yes, but one that lets us piggyback on trending topics and find content related to our field more easily. But there’s such a thing as hashtag overload, as evidenced in this tweet:

I’m thrilled that this user shared my content! But including four hashtags — pretty generic ones, at that — make this tweet hard to read, give it a spammy feel, and doesn’t really contribute to the conversation around the subjects of social media, marketing, Google+, or Pinterest. Instead, choose one or two hashtags to include in your tweets that will really contribute to the conversation happening around those topics.

  • 10) Insulting Your Customer Base

Seems obvious, right? It wasn’t to online pawn show Pawngo. After the 2012 Super Bowl, Pawngo dumped a huge pile of Butterfinger candy bars in the middle of Boston’s Copley Square a day after New England’s heartbreaking loss. The reference was to New England Patriot’s receiver Wes Welker dropping the catch that sealed the team’s Super Bowl loss. Take a look at one of the tweets Pawngo sent out leading up to the PR stunt:

Pawngo ✔@Pawngo We’re giving Boston a late morning snack to get over Sunday’s loss #butterfingers

7 Feb 12 ReplyRetweetFavorite

Seem like a low blow? Customers certainly took it that way — and they took to social media to let them know. Quite a different hashtag than the one above, eh?

PROPER @plymptonproper 8 Feb 12 @Pawngo You’re venture capital group shouldn’t be impressed by PR stunt. Good business is a game of addition, not subtraction. #Customerlost

Pawngo ✔@Pawngo @plymptonproper Sorry we lost you as a customer. If you live chat w/one of our reps on the site, u might realize that we’re not that bad :-/

8 Feb 12 ReplyRetweetFavorite

Thing is, Pawngo really meant it to make Boston fans feel better; but it didn’t feel that way to Boston residents. Make sure you know your customers well enough to joke around with them before getting so familiar like Pawngo did.

  • 11) “Targeting” Poorly With Automation

Otherwise known as spamming people. That’s what happened to AT&T back in March when they were trying to capitalize on the March Madness hoopla for which they had set up a promotion. The goal was to get the word out about their contest to those who would be interested, but what actually happened was poor targeting. Take former HubSpot employee Brian Whalley, for example, who was the recipient of one of AT&T’s tweet. Brian doesn’t follow AT&T, he has never been their customer, he doesn’t tweet about basketball, and there is no indication he is even a sports fan, according to his biIn fact, the only thing Brian had in his profile to indicate he might be interested in the March Madness promotion was the fact that he lives in one of the many cities in which the promotion was happening. And it wasn’t just Brian Whalley who noticed this problem, either. Thousands of spammy tweets had gone out to unsuspecting tweeters that had little or no interest in such a promotion. Which brings us to our next cringeworthy social media activity …

  • 12) Posting WAY Too Frequently

Another result of AT&T’s social media automation snafu was a barrage of tweets that clogged up people’s news feeds. Take a look at this posting frequency:

That’s multiple tweets a minute. And nobody has that much remarkable, relevant content to share. Every social media network has a different optimal posting frequency. In fact, Twitter lets brands get away with the highest frequency of all the social networks because content is buried so quickly. But tweeting more than once an hour has shown to decrease the click-through rate of your links by over 200%, according to HubSpot’s Dan Zarrella. And if you’re using Facebook or Google+ for your brand’s social media presence, shoot for 3-5 updates per day.

  • 13) Retweeting Instead of Generating Original Content

Okay, so I did a little photo editing of my own Twitter account to prove a point for this one, but it did come from a particularly RT-heavy week for me. See those green arrows in the top right corner of every tweet? Those indicate the tweet was written by another user, and retweeted by me to my followers.

Retweeting is a way to share someone else’s content — a good thing! But doing it to this extent is going too far. That’s because people have followed you to hear what you have to say. That means they want to hear your original ideas, see links to your content, and get access to the content others have published that you find valuable. If your balance tips too heavy on that last part, back off the RT button and start creating more of your own content that you can publish to your fans and followers.

Shout out to Corey Eridon @ HubSpot

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16 Ways to Simplify Your Prospects’ Decision-Making Process by Ellie Mirman

16 Ways to Simplify Your Prospects’ Decision-Making Process

by Ellie Mirman.

In an effort to break through the clutter and get the attention of more potential customers, are marketers going too far? A recent article from Forbes reported that decision simplicity was the number one driver of likelihood to buy, and the impact of simplifying purchase decisions for consumers is 4x stronger than the favored marketing strategy of engagement.

In fact, research company Corporate Executive Board (CEB) also found that a 20% increase in decision simplicity results in a:

96% increase in customer loyalty;

86% increase in likelihood to purchase and;

115% increase in likelihood to recommend.

CEB is not the first organization to tout simplicity as a key driver in increasing conversions and sales. MarketingExperiments also advocates for limiting “unsupervised thinking” among your prospects in order to effectively guide more people to conversion. As it relates to landing pages, many marketers have adopted a lot of best practices based on this principle — removing navigation and distracting calls-to-action, keeping forms short, and clearly advertising the value of the offer. But this principle is applicable to all areas of our marketing — by simplifying our marketing, we can illuminate the path to conversion to drive better results.

**Below are 16 ways you can simplify your marketing to make your prospects’ decision-making process easier.*

16 Ways to Simplify Your Prospects’ Decision-Making Process

1) Add Calls-to-Action

The first place to start is to add a call-to-action (CTA) to your website. On any given web page, you should be able to answer, “What do I want people to do here?” Then, make it clear to your visitor that exact path. Do you want them to call you? Download an ebook and become a lead? Follow you in social media? Tell people exactly what you want, and it’s more likely they’ll end up doing it. Effective calls-to-action use actionable language (e.g. “Download Now”), numbers, a sense of urgency, and stand out among the rest of the page.

2) Limit Distracting Calls-to-Action

On the flip side, you don’t want to overwhelm your prospects with too many calls-to-action. From the visitors’ perspective, suddenly they’re in Times Square with ads all around, and they don’t know where to look or what to do. Rather, you want to create a one-way street — not a 10-way intersection that paralyzes your prospects or helps them tune out your calls-to-action. If you do have multiple CTAs on a page or in a piece of content, make one primary by featuring it more prominently, and when your prospect clicks through to its actual landing page, remove any additional navigation links or CTAs on that page to focus their attention on completing the conversion you want them to.

3) Deliver What’s Advertised

Some sneaky marketers used to do a bait and switch — advertise a raffle for a free iPad, but when someone clicked through, they’d display an ad to buy a car. Any time you deliver on something different from what’s advertised, you not only confuse your leads, but you also generate unqualified leads. If someone’s signing up because they’re interested in iPads, it’s very possible they’re not going to be interested in whatever you deliver that is not an iPad.

4) Tell People What They’re Getting

Any time you’re offering something to your prospects, be clear about exactly what it is. The point of the offer is to give your prospects a reason to engage with you — if they don’t know what it is, why would they bother? Is it an ebook, a webinar, a slide deck? What is the topic covered in your offer?

5) Tell People WIIFM?

Not only do you need to tell people what they’re getting, but you also need to explain why they should care — the value of your offer. In other words, ‘What’s In It For Me?’ (WIIFM?). Any transaction should be an equal (or better) exchange between you and your prospect; for example, they give you their email address in exchange for a free ebook.

6) Don’t Hide Your Pricing Information

Any time I come across a website with no pricing information, I start to think that something is fishy. Either they customize their pricing for every deal individually (in which case, I worry I’m going to get tricked into a worse deal), or the price will be so high it’s out of my range. Either way, I’m not interested in engaging with your company. Don’t withhold your pricing information. Instead, make it easy to navigate to within the products section of your website.

7) Provide Product Guides (About Your Product and Your Industry)

I (as a prospect) have a decision to make: whether or not to buy your product, or possibly opt for another competing product. I’ll take any information you or anyone else can provide to help me with that decision. Providing product guides — either about your own product or an analysis of the industry and the competing products available — is a great help in supporting your prospects’ evaluation process.

8) Share Recommendations/Testimonials From Customers and Experts

While it’s great to provide your own take on your product and the industry, you are of course biased, so providing any third-party recommendations — from users or experts — is a great way to ease a prospects’ decision to go with your company. At HubSpot, for example, we curate social media threads, blog articles, and case studies from customers and experts and feature them on our website — even on our homepage.

9) Let People Know How They Can Get in Touch

How can prospects get in touch with you? By phone, through email, via online chat? Make it clear on your website how people can get in touch with you, so those hottest prospects can reach out when they most want to talk with you. At HubSpot, this was a big piece of feedback we heard from our prospects — a lot of people wanted to talk with someone and didn’t know how. As a result, we added our phone number and a way to contact sales in the footer of every web page on our site.

10) Align Navigation With What Your Buyers Are Looking For

As marketers, we can sometimes get lost in our own work and how we discuss things internally, and if this translates into our marketing, it can cause a lot of confusion for your website visitors and prospects. For the content on your website, think about how your buyers speak, think, and what they might be looking for — and align your content and navigation around those revelations.

11) Surface Top-Searched or Top-Visited Content

Aside from surfacing the key sections of your website that your prospects want to navigate to, take a look at the most popular content on your site, and surface that as well. By looking at your most popular content (top-searched, top-visited, etc.) you can understand more about what your prospects are looking for and make it even easier for new prospects to find it. Two great ways to do this is to feature your top-performing offer on your homepage, and list the most popular articles on the homepage of your blog.

12) Don’t Ignore Questions or Feedback

Sometimes we marketers get tough questions and critical feedback — especially considering prospects’ ease of commenting on blog articles or speaking up in social media. Oftentimes, ignoring these comments can worsen the situation, leaving a prospect unhappy or inciting them to post even more critical comments. Every time a prospect asks a question or provides feedback, you’re given a great opportunity to engage with them and address any questions or issues they have. Be sure to monitor and respond to any blog or social media comments to catch these opportunities to lead more prospects to conversion. There are plenty of free and paid tools available to help you monitor conversations in social media. And if you’re both a HootSuite and HubSpot customer, you can use our closed-loop social integration to directly monitor your leads on Twitter!

13) Categorize Your Content by Skill Level, Role, Etc.

It’s very likely that you’re already targeting different types of potential customers — various roles, backgrounds, and needs among your buyer personas. Help these personas to self-identify what content and which products are best suited for their particular needs by categorizing and labeling your content. At HubSpot, they label their content by skill level (introductory, intermediate, and advanced — just check out the top of this very article!) and by industry and role (small business vs. marketing teams, non-profit vs. ecommerce, etc.). This helps your prospects find the best content for them more quickly, rather than giving up, getting overwhelmed by the sheer amount of content we provide, or getting lost on your website.

14) Assign a DRI/Owner for Each Channel/Asset

A DRI is a Directly Responsible Person — an owner for a particular asset. Having an owner for each marketing channel or asset allows you to make sure nothing falls through the cracks. You’ll be more able to evaluate the potential conversion paths, respond to questions from prospects stuck at different stages of the conversion path, and make sure you’re getting the best results from each channel and asset. Here are a few more ideas for structuring an effective marketing team.

15) Pick a Campaign, and Focus All Channels on It

It can be overwhelming to juggle a lot of different offers, channels, and campaigns all at once — both for you as a marketer, and for your prospect as someone following your company. Look for opportunities to combine marketing efforts and focus multiple channels on a single campaign. Not only will you rest a little easier, but you’ll also get better (compounding) results and help focus your prospects on your top campaign.

16) Focus on the 1-3 Metrics That Are Most Important to Your Business

Not only do you want to simplify your prospects’ experience with your company, but you also want to simplify your marketing efforts. This helps you focus your efforts for better results. A key part of that is focusing on a few metrics that are most important to your business, as this will influence your strategy and where you focus your time, your calls-to-action, and other efforts mentioned above. To determine which metrics should drive your strategy, spend some time determining your marketing team’s specific goals, and then identify the top metrics that will indicate success or failure to achieve those goals.

Shout out to HubSpot

5 Reasons To Stop Cold Calling And Start Networking by FixBuildnDrive

Can you imagine what happens to people when you call them cold? Well, no surprise, they stiffen up. They get uncomfortable. And they wish they hadn’t answered the phone. So what options do you have. Uh . . . how about networking?

All across the world right now, people are dialing for dollars. Insurance salesmen, consultants, recruiters, packaging suppliers, SEO providers and hundreds of other types of folks looking for a new client.

Why? Because their boss told them to do it. “100 calls a day, please.” The numbers game.

But cold calls are bad for business. They are a bad use of time and aren’t a smart way to begin a new relationship. Oh, and nobody likes making these calls either.

And for those of you who want to disagree right away (maybe you’ve had some success blowing cold air on people), I don’t care. I’m sure there are exceptions to the “cold calls don’t work” argument I’m making. But I don’t care.

Because the world has changed so much. And the tools to meet people more effectively are plentiful. Here’s are 5 ways to connect with new people without them freezing up right away:

1. Start blogging

While establishing a blog takes significantly longer than making phone calls, it is a superior strategy for introducing you, your company and its products to others. You can learn about mistakes bloggers make and some tips for getting started with blogging. But once you get up and running, a blog makes your website more interesting to Google, more dynamic to get return visitors and (very important) helps you build relevant awareness and subject matter expertise. In other words, people get to know and trust you in advance of your first contact.

2. Use LinkedIn

This one seems awfully simple. You need to meet Mike (purchasing manager at target company x). Bill (your old coworker) used to work with Mike at a prior company. You go on to LinkedIn and learn this news. That the person you need to know already knows someone you know. Now what? Well, you ask Bill to introduce you to Mike. Sounds simple. But so few people do it. So many people are lazy on LinkedIn and don’t personally create and nurture LinkedIn connections. They just collect them like postage stamps. Don’t do that. You are smarter than this.

3. Join groups and attend events

There are industry groups aplenty, local community networking groups, and meetup.com groups all over. So there’s no excuse. You can develop your personal brand right now. In front of real people. They can see that you are a good person, that you are patient and have the needs of others on your mind as well. And if you are smart, you’ll find a group or two and sponsor them. Or get involved in their board. That’s good networking.

4. Use Twitter or Create a Facebook Page

Not everyone is comfortable on social media. And if you need help, ask me. Or hook up with a smart social media agency to help you establish a strategy and keep up a great, engaging relationship with new fans and followers. If you want to do it on your own, make sure to have a Facebook content calendar and learn the golden rules for new Twitter users. Oh, and if you are wondering whether it’s weird that sales people use Twitter, you’re wrong. Use these tools to create, establish and maintain a friendly and helpful relationship with current and potential customers.

5. Offer to speak or lead workshops

When you stand up in front of a group of people you get instant credibility. Until you screw up. But you probably won’t. Especially if you model your style after people like Thom Singer. He’s someone who can teach you how to speak with a purpose. You can learn how to engage an audience as a speaker. While its not a bed of roses (audience can be cold too), it is a great way to also build social credibility (credibility that lets people feel more comfortable with you). And the business will come in so much more quickly.

So try these ideas instead of cold calling.

Unlike a slow moving glacier, these “warming up” techniques will thaw the corporate ice cubes and create a fast moving stream of business to you and your company.

Shout out to Tim Tyrell-Smith

Business tips: 21 ways to break the ice by Tom Searcy

Open-ended questions are the icebreakers that lead to more engaging business discussions with customers, vendors, partners and prospects

(Credit: British Antarctic Society) Every matchmaker in the business will tell you that the first step to developing a relationship with someone is to get them talking. Most of us meet new people as a part of our jobs — prospects, coworkers, customers, vendors or partners. And it is part of our jobs in these moments to connect and interact with these people.

Breaking the ice with someone should accomplish several things:

— Start a conversation on a positive note

— Move the first interaction past data exchange to connection

— Make a memory-link of the person, personality and name

Here are 21 questions you can use to break the ice:

1. What is the best part of your job?

2. What is the best part of working at your company?

3. When did you know that you wanted to work in your field?

4. Who was the most influential person in your career choice?

5. What was your biggest accomplishment in the last year?

6. Who do you look forward to seeing when you come to work?

7. What are you most excited about that you see coming up in the next six months?

8. What was the most impressive thing you saw happen in your industry in the last year?

9. Which company in your industry is the pacesetter and what are they doing?

10. What’s the smartest thing your company’s done in the last year to deal with the economy?

11. What’s the best technique you have been using to better manage your time?

12. Which of your company’s initiatives for next year has you the most excited?

13. If you had only one accomplishment on which to base your annual review, what would it be?

14. What’s the secret sauce for managing people to their highest success?

15. Who is the best leader you know that you personally try to emulate?

16. Where do you think the big innovation in your industry will come from in the next year or two?

17. What was your best decision in the last year?

18. Who are the best thinkers in your field that you follow?

19. What sea change do you see coming in the next year or two in the business?

20. What technology has made the biggest difference in your personal work in the last year?

21. What is the biggest thing you will stop doing next year?

You will notice that the questions are geared to make the other person stop, consider, compare and then make a choice. This is all intentional. You are engaging them at a level deeper than the transactional conversation. That’s the ice you are breaking — the ice that keeps you from truly engaging.

Bonus question No. 1: After the person answers the opening question, ask “Why?”

Bonus question No. 2: How can I help with what you are trying to get done?

Shout out to Tom Searcy

The Power of Appreciation Marketing by Lory Fabian

DO YOU KNOW THAT?

People will forget what you said,

People will forget what you did,

but people will never forget

how you made them feel.”

-Maya Angelou

These words written by Maya Angelou express my passion & belief regarding how powerful & impactive it is when you start using an APPRECIATION MARKETING system; aka SendOutCards.com/loryfabian.

Appreciation Marketing is not really a new term and sometimes is sometimes called relationship marking.

What is it then?

  • It is a new way of doing business the “old fashioned” way.
  • ”It is putting the “High Touch” back into the “High Tech” world.
  • Appreciation Marketing IS looking at why you like to do business with certain companies or people.
  • It is putting the needs of others before your own.
  • Appreciation Marketing is showing genuine appreciation to others when they DO NOT EXPECT IT.

I am a Client Relations Specialist.

The more research I do, the more MOUNTING evidence I find that PROVES:

People spend their money with people they like!

WHILE THIS is certainly not a news flash…it definitely makes me wonder why so few companies practice Appreciation Marketing.

If being successful is that simple, why aren’t more people building stronger relationships?

According to Google, over 660,000 small businesses went out of business in 2010.

Why I want to know is “What did the businesses that succeeded do differently than the ones who went out of business?”  And why are companies squandering millions of marketing dollars every year on advertising dollars?

 

If you think about it:

  • Common business practices were replaced by faxes, text, emails, etc.
  • Because everything in life is faster, and faster and faster, a lot of companies perceive that faster is the way people want to do business, but they are wrong!
  • Customers are people and people need to feel appreciated, at least most of the time.

Before I share the ‘Why’ and ‘How To’ practice appreciation marketing:

It is IMPORTANT THAT YOU UNDERSTAND

Appreciation is not just for business, it is also for your employees.

Even more importantly, it is about showing your family and friends how much you appreciate them.

While my focus is on helping small businesses grow, I believe, like many others, that your job is important, but not as important as your family and friends.

And why is that?????  Let me ask you a couple of questions?

If your home burned in a fire or

If your house was demolished by a tornado, “WHO WOULD YOU CALL?”

If you lost your job and needed food or money, “WHO WOULD YOU CALL?”

If you ran out of gas on the freeway today, “WHO WOULD YOU CALL?”

“Who WOULD WE call?”
Our friends and family, of course!

If we needed a new kidney, isn’t the first one to always offer their kidney a family member or a friend?

Our family & friends are the ones that are always there for us; so it is important that they come first and you show your love & appreciation.  We need to let them know how grateful we are.  None of us are guaranteed a tomorrow, so express your love and appreciation today!

  • I CHALLENGE YOU to:
  • Take your spouse on a date; spend one on one time with your kids;
  • Surprise your mother with a bouquet of flowers; buy your father his favorite cigar or take him golfing.
  • Invite your parents out to lunch or dinner.
  • If money is an issue…Make Friday nights FAMILY NIGHT;
  • PICK UP THE PHONE and CALL Your Best Friend or Love one; Ask them how they are?  Tell them how you feel!!

NEVER EVER TAKE THEM FOR GRANTED

AGAIN!!! NONE OF US ARE GUARENTEED A TOMORROW, TAKE ACTION TODAY!

Let’s get back to the business side of Appreciation Marketing.

Another component to think about is being “Likeable.”

Likeability is Our Lifeline. If your customers don’t like you, they will take their business elsewhere.  Right?  Isn’t that what you do?  I know I do.

Likeable people are perceived as capable, respectful, approachable and positive.

Likeable people ARE THE ONES THAT GET THE PROMOTIONS.

While less-liked people are seen as arrogant, conniving, negative and manipulative. They may get the first sale, but chances are they don’t often get repeat business nor referrals.

Remember, if they like you, they’ll do business with you!

There are some companies that we all do business with that don’t have a name or a face;

THEY ARE either TOO BIG, we don’t have a choice, or it’s too much of a hassle to switch.

Companies like the electric company, the gas and water company, our cable company and/or phone company.

With some companies, we spend our money with them because they know our name and some of them are even are our friends.  WE didn’t necessarily know them before we started doing business, but now, they are our realtor, our hairdressers, our financial advisors, our lawyers, our virtual assistant, our painter, our contractor or our floor company and/or our

Social media coach.

THESE PEOPLE always light up when they see us; they take our calls.  We are not only loyal customers…we make great referrals.

According to Zig Zigglar (world famous salesman) “You can have whatever you want if you help enough people to get what they want.”

Let’s look at a couple of ways to start showing appreciation:

First we must CHANGING OUR WAY OF THINKING!

Back in the 1980’s, most business knew everyone’s name and were glad we came; like the TV Cheer’s series.  Now …not so much.

One way to begin Appreciation Marketing is by serving others to achieve their goals and dreams.  {Same philosophy as BNI’s Giver’s Gain}

LET’S LOOK AT WHY SHOULD WE USE Appreciation Marketing:

What makes you a loyal customer is the same thing that makes your customers loyal to you? 

Real super stars in any business are ALL ready practicing Appreciation Marketing.

They GO the extra mile…saying thank you and showing appreciation.

They ALWAYS SHOW interest in their customers and always SHOW their GRATITUDE!

Another thought about WHY you should use Appreciation Marketing:

How many of you have ever splurged on a gift for someone; spent more than you wanted to for the perfect gift and were so excited to see what  their reaction would be?   You waited. And waited and waited and waited.  When you finally speak with them, you have to ask “Hey, how did you like my gift?” They say” Oh yeah..thanks..IT WAS GREAT!”

How did that make you feel?

How many of you on your way to work or a meeting, stopped TO LET A merging car in or let someone turn left or get in front of you… YOU THEN STARE STRAIGHT AT THE BACK WINDOW OF THE CAR…WAITING FOR A GESTURE. SOMEKIND OF WAVE OF THE HAND TO SAY THANKS AND IT NEVER CAME.  Do you sometimes think “Wow…they didn’t even appreciate what I just did for them?” especially when you are running late.

NOT SAYING THANK YOU IS WORSE THAN

HOW IMPORTANT A THANK YOU IS.

IF WE CALL or EMAIL An EXPECTED THANK YOU …It’s nice.

BUT IF WE DON’T GIVE A THANK YOU AT ALL…THAT PERSON FEELS UNDERAPPRECIATED.

IT’S Common sense to say thank you?  But Mark Twain states it best:

“I don’t know why they call it common sense…it really isn’t that common.”

SELLING IS MORE THAN TECHNIQUES;

it is about BUILDING STRONGer & Better RELATIONSHIPs

Which in turn, will TAKE YOU to HIGHER LEVELS OF SUCCCESS.

Some businesses take the BIG GAME HUNT MARKETING APPROACH:

IF YOU ARE A GOOD SHOT; YOU KEEP BRINGING NEW CUSTOMERS.

HOWEVER, YOU NEVER GET TO REST; YOU ALWAYS HAVE TO FIND MORE CUSTOMERS

I PREFER THE FARMING TECHNIQUE:

DEVELOP & FORM LONG LASTING RELATIONSHIIPS built ON TRUST;

IF YOU ARE STEADFAST; WHAT YOU GIVE OUT- YOU WILL GET BACK AND MORE.

If you are getting the same unwanted results year after year, why not take a chance on giving

Appreciation marketing a try???

If you want joy, give joy TO OTHERS;

If you want love, LEARN TO GIVE LOVE;

If you want ATTENTION & APPRECIATION, learn to give attention and appreciation;

If you want affluent, help others BECOME MATERIALLY AFFLUENT;

If you want to be blessed, silently bless others;

Can you imagine how successful ALL OF US WOULD BE IF

WE LIVED BY DEEPAK’S WORDS?

Dr. Deepak Chopra is a world-renowned mind-body healing pioneer and the founder of the Chopra Center for Wellbeing in Carlsbad, California.

A Huge Shout Out to Tommy & Curtis {Appreciation Marketing}…Your Story is my Story too…only the names have been changed! …wink wink  Thank You for Sharing!